PANDEMIC, PARANOIA & PRACTICE

Artists of ARTRA Canvas

Art, as a medium of expression is often deliberated by the way it is expressed – by artists, moulded, shaped, sculpted – a canvas of empty emotion is a canvas unused. As the artist pours their thoughts and ponderings, musings and reflection on to their work of art, it is the becoming of what they convey and what the audience interprets. This component of interpretation follows a crucial element that an artist practices, which results in the novelty of their work. ARTRA Canvas, launched on the 17th of June, is a platform that promotes the works of artists from the nine provinces of Sri Lanka on www.artra.lk/artworks/canvas. In partnership with ISSO, one of Sri Lanka’s inventive restaurants celebrating Sri Lankan culinary, the first instalment of ARTRA Canvas showcased a series of works reflecting the artist’s response to the pandemic. From over a hundred works, we have curated a comprehensive representation of the works of art whose perspective is strongly presented.

1.Ishaq Hamid
Boralesgamuwa

Ishaq Hamid from the Western Province of Sri Lanka, presents graphic works of art that are bold, conveying a deeper understanding of the course and progression of the pandemic and its results and consequences upon society. His works of art, expressed and reinforced by the creative representation allows the viewer to be able to understand and reciprocate feelings evoked by the work of art. From ‘Last Supper’ to ‘American Gothic’, each element portrayed on the works of art exist as symbols, meant to address each aspect and characteristic of the period of isolation and quarantine, imminent death and suffering. ‘Last Supper’ takes on a unique perspective as he paints a lone figure at a long dinner much like the original tale of the ‘last supper’, of which the work of art explores the meaning that the title implies.

2. Bonnie Fernando
Panadura

Hailing from the Western Province of Sri Lanka, artist and graphic designer Bonnie Fernando is a self-taught illustrator whose works are animated narrations of the real world. Bonnie Fernando’s graphic works of art are flamboyant in colour and bold in message as he conveys through an animated understanding the course and progression of the pandemic and its result and consequence upon the human civilization. His creative representation allows the viewer to be able to understand and reciprocate feelings evoked by this work of art. From ‘Save Us’ to ‘Demented Nature’, Bonnie portrays the pandemic and its consequences, its stories unconventionally; hands reaching up from their graves to dancing the volcano’s crater, each component beautifully captures the people of the virus, their lives metaphorically.

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5th November, 2020 Visual Art | Paintings

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